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Birds, Wildlife and Gardening

Paradise found: London gallery showcases art inspired by Islamic garden design

<p>Nature-driven artist and environmentalist Clare Celeste Börsch among contributors to exhibition exploring concept of Eden</p><p>As in many paradise gardens, particularly those inspired by Islamic culture, a fountain lies at the heart of the quadrilateral garden created inside the <a href="https://www.agakhancentre.org.uk/gallery/making-paradise/">Aga Khan Centre</a> gallery in King’s Cross, London. This fountain doesn’t spout water, however, but beautiful, intricate strips of paper with laser-cut flowers made by Berlin-based American artist <a href="https://www.clareceleste.com/">Clare Celeste Börsch</a>.</p><p>The fountain is at the centre of <a href="https://www.agakhancentre.org.uk/gallery/making-paradise/">Making Paradise</a>, an exhibition exploring the concept of Eden through art and Islamic garden design. On display are numerous artworks depicting trees, flowers and fruits, including botanical illustrations from the Royal Horticultural Society’s Lindley library collection, alongside contemporary works.</p><p>Nature is so resilient and creative … you can grow a garden, green urban spaces – there is so much potential for regeneration</p><p> <span>Related: </span><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2021/apr/16/forests-felling-swedens-ancient-trees-biodiversity-sami-environment">‘Forests are not renewable’: the felling of Sweden’s ancient trees</a> </p><p><a href="https://www.agakhancentre.org.uk/gallery/making-paradise/">Making Paradise</a> opens its doors to visitors with prebooked tickets from 17 May and runs until the end of September.</p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/may/14/paradise-found-london-gallery-showcases-art-inspired-by-islamic-garden-design-aoe">Continue reading...</a>

Nature-driven artist and environmentalist Clare Celeste Börsch among contributors to exhibition exploring concept of Eden

As in many paradise gardens, particularly those inspired by Islamic culture, a fountain lies at the heart of the quadrilateral garden created inside the Aga Khan Centre gallery in King’s Cross, London. This fountain doesn’t spout water, however, but beautiful, intricate strips of paper with laser-cut flowers made by Berlin-based American artist Clare Celeste Börsch.

The fountain is at the centre of Making Paradise, an exhibition exploring the concept of Eden through art and Islamic garden design. On display are numerous artworks depicting trees, flowers and fruits, including botanical illustrations from the Royal Horticultural Society’s Lindley library collection, alongside contemporary works.

Nature is so resilient and creative … you can grow a garden, green urban spaces – there is so much potential for regeneration

Related: ‘Forests are not renewable’: the felling of Sweden’s ancient trees

Making Paradise opens its doors to visitors with prebooked tickets from 17 May and runs until the end of September.

Continue reading… Source

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