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Birds, Wildlife and Gardening

‘Odd, eerie and haunting’: behind Maya Lin’s Manhattan ghost forest

<p>The famed artist and architect draws attention to climate change’s biodiversity loss with a forest of dying Atlantic cedars in New York</p><p>In Manhattan’s bustling Flatiron District, 49 coastal Atlantic cedars – each around 40ft tall, leafless branches grasping at the sky – tower over Madison Square Park’s usually flat, grassy plain. The spectral forest, a new installation by the artist and architect Maya Lin, looms like a jarring holdout from winter – barren, save for smattering of lichen on each trunk, a stark contrast to the verdant six-acre park’s late-spring growth and the clean lines of the skyscrapers overhead.</p><p> <span>Related: </span><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2021/apr/06/richard-mosse-irish-photographer-amazon-environmental-damage">'They are living maps': how Richard Mosse captured environmental damage in the Amazon</a> </p> <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2021/may/13/maya-lin-manhattan-madison-square-park">Continue reading...</a>

The famed artist and architect draws attention to climate change’s biodiversity loss with a forest of dying Atlantic cedars in New York

In Manhattan’s bustling Flatiron District, 49 coastal Atlantic cedars – each around 40ft tall, leafless branches grasping at the sky – tower over Madison Square Park’s usually flat, grassy plain. The spectral forest, a new installation by the artist and architect Maya Lin, looms like a jarring holdout from winter – barren, save for smattering of lichen on each trunk, a stark contrast to the verdant six-acre park’s late-spring growth and the clean lines of the skyscrapers overhead.

Related: ‘They are living maps’: how Richard Mosse captured environmental damage in the Amazon

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